Is Osteoporosis The Cause Of Your Back Pain?

 

Age plays a big role in spine fractures. As you age, your bones may become increasingly thinner and weaker, leading to the condition known as osteoporosis. The effort required to just hold your body erect can be enough to cause a spinal fracture when someone has osteoporosis.

Most of us have heard about osteoporosis, but we’re about to start hearing a lot more. That’s because the incidence of osteoporosis is sharply rising as population’s age in the United States.  Osteoporosis is especially common in postmenopausal women. In fact, it is estimated that approximately 25% of all postmenopausal women in the United States have had a vertebral compression fracture.

Do My Weak Bones (or Low Bone Mass) Put Me At Risk For A Spinal Compression Fracture?

While osteoporosis is far more prevalent in women – approximately four times as many women have low bone mass or osteoporosis as men – it still occurs in men. As many as 25% of men over age 50 will suffer a bone fracture (e.g. hip or spine) due to osteoporosis.

Because osteoporosis is a “silent” disease, meaning that there are typically no symptoms until a fracture occurs, it is not uncommon for someone with back pain to be unaware of the fact that he or she has actually fractured a vertebra (or multiple vertebrae) in their spine.

What is a Compression Fracture?

A spinal fracture due to osteoporosis is commonly referred to as a compression fracture, but can also be called a vertebral fracture, osteoporotic fracture, or wedge fracture. Spinal compression fractures that occur as a result of osteoporosis are actually quite common, occurring in approximately 700,000 people in the U.S. each year. Most compression fractures result from slight or no force in older people with osteoporosis.

In a compression fracture of the spine, the drum-shaped part of one or more back bones (vertebrae) collapses into itself and becomes compressed into a wedge shape.

Typical Compression Fracture Symptoms

The main clinical symptoms of vertebral fractures typically include one or a combination of the following symptoms:

– Sudden onset of back pain

– Standing or walking will usually make the pain worse

– Lying on one’s back makes the pain less intense

– Limited spinal mobility

– Height loss

– Deformity and disability

Sometimes a compression fracture in the spine may not cause any back pain or other symptoms. Therefore, even if there is not back pain, middle age or elderly persons (especially women) need to be concerned about potential fractures if there is height loss, limited ability to twist and bend the back, and/or deformity that develops in the spine.

Non-Invasive Compression Fracture Treatment

Kyphoplasty is offered for patients with acute painful compression fractures of the spine. These fractures typically cause severe pain and may lead to the patients being wheelchair bound or bedridden, with severely limited daily activities. The most common reason for these fractures is the presence of osteoporosis; other less common causes are trauma and cancer.

The kyphoplasty procedure is a minimally invasive, non-surgical, outpatient treatment performed through one or two needle holes for each spine fracture. The needles are inserted using the latest in high resolution imaging technology. Balloons are inserted through the needle(s) to re-expand the bone; the resultant cavity is filled with a bone cement to internally cast the broken bone. Kyphoplasty procedures typically result in greater than 90 percent of patients experiencing near-complete or complete pain relief.

Don’t Suffer from Compression Fracture Back Pain Any Longer

Our Indianapolis radiologists offer state-of-the-art, minimally invasive, nonsurgical procedures, and have accumulated one of the largest single center practices in the country. Leading Central Indiana, Interventional Physicians is a leading provider of kyphoplasty and back pain management services and have served Central Indiana since 2003.

Summertime Back Pain Tips

EASY WAYS TO MINIMIZE BACK PAIN

Summer can be one of the most enjoyable times of the year, but for some with back pain it’s not enjoyable at all. Simple activities exacerbate your pain. You probably know which activities make your back pain worse. So, we thought we’d share some tips to help you enjoy some of the most popular summertime activities – and minimize your chronic back pain.

  • Events: Summer is the time for America’s favorite past time, baseball. Unfortunately, going to a game can be a disaster for your back. Stadium seating wasn’t designed to take our different shapes and sizes into consideration. So, if you are allowed to bring in cushions or seat pads bring one! The extra padding and support helps alleviate strain on your back so, instead of being distracted by your back pain, you can cheer on your team.
  • Travel: Summer is one of the busiest times for families to travel. With the kids out of school and nobody really wanting to be at work during the most beautiful time of the year, this gets people in the mood for vacationing.
  • Car: If you are taking a road trip, be sure to give yourself time to stop and see the sights. Sitting for long periods can take its toll on your back. Also, when packing the cooler full of snacks throw an ice pack in for your back as well.
  • Plane: Even if you do not have to use the bathroom it is good to get up and walk around on extended flights. Also, making sure your feet are at a ninety degree angle while sitting will help reduce pain in your lower back. Asking for a pillow to rest your feet can help you reach that degree.

GREAT SUMMERTIME ACTIVITIES FOR PEOPLE WITH BACK PAIN

There are also some beneficial activities that are great for managing your back pain (assuming that you have your doctor’s approval). Things the whole family can do or you can enjoy solo.

  • Swimming: Getting to the pool or a nearby lake can be one of the best activities for your back in this summer. The “weightlessness” effect of water supports your body so you can  mildly move your muscles through the waves. You build muscle strength without the stress of gravity.
  • Bike Rides: Hopping on your bike and taking a ride around the neighborhood can help those with lower back pain. There are also many different types of bikes that enable those with back problems to enjoy a bike ride. Some people may find a bicycle with a forward-leaning position is most comfortable, while others may prefer recumbent bike that reclines.  Check out your local bicycle store and ask which models they recommend. Make sure you test ride before you buy.

Take your summer back this year. Don’t let back pain stop you from enjoyed all  that summer has to offer.

If you are experiencing back pain, it is important to see a doctor and find out exactly what is causing the pain. Once the cause of pain is found, your doctor will recommend a treatment plan that fits your needs, including exercises that will improve your condition.

Interventional Physicians of Indiana is a leading provider of kyphoplasty and back pain management services and has served Central Indiana since 2003. We offer state-of-the-art, minimally invasive, nonsurgical procedures, and have one of the largest single center practices in the country.

How Balloon Kyphoplasty Helps Relieve Back Pain

What Kind of Back Pain Does Ballon Kyphoplasty Treat?

The adult spine is a column of 33 bones that protects the spinal cord and enables us to stand upright. Each bony segment of the spine is referred to as a vertebra (two or more are called vertebrae).

Having a spinal fracture means that one of the vertebra has either cracked or collapsed. Like other bones in the body, the extent of the break can vary, from a hairline fracture to a complete collapse of the vertebral body.

When a bone breaks, localized swelling can occur, and pain is common. In the spine, swelling and misalignment can irritate adjacent tissue and nerves. Damage to even one vertebra can alter the alignment of your spine, upsetting the distribution of weight along the spinal column and setting the stage for another fracture.

What Are The Benefits of Balloon Kyphoplasty for Chronic Back Pain?

Balloon Kyphoplasty can reduce or eliminate your back pain from a spinal fracture, as well as restore vertebral body height and proper alignment of your spine. Early and effective treatment (fixing the broken bone) may reduce the consequences of spinal fractures, especially those associated with other treatments, for example, prolonged bed rest or use of analgesics (pain relievers).

Other benefits include sustained improvement in mobility, improvement in ability to perform activities of daily living, and improved quality of life.

What is the Ballon Kyphoplasty Procedure?

Balloon Kyphoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that can repair spinal fractures. It takes about an hour per fracture level to treat a fracture with balloon kyphoplasty, and the procedure is generally done on an outpatient basis.

4 Steps of the Balloon Kyphoplasty Procedure:

Step 1: With a hollow instrument, a narrow pathway is made into the fractured bone. A small orthopedic balloon is guided through the instrument into the vertebra. The incision site is approximately 1 centimeter in length.

Step 2: Next, the balloon is carefully inflated in an attempt to raise the collapsed vertebra and return it to its normal position. Once the vertebra is in the correct position, the balloon is deflated and removed. This process creates a void (space) within the vertebral body. The void functions as a “container” for the bone cement.

Step 3: The void is then filled with bone cement to stabilize the fracture.

Step 4: The cement forms an internal cast that holds the vertebra in place. Generally, the procedure is done on both sides of the vertebra.

Kyphoplasty procedures typically result in greater than 90% of patients experiencing near-complete or complete pain relief.

What is an Interventional Radiologist? 

An interventional radiologist is a medical doctor with additional education and training (fellowship) above and beyond the required four years of a basic diagnostic radiology residency. All of our interventional radiologists are board certified by the American Board of Radiology. Learn more about ushere.

Don’t suffer from Acute Back Pain and longer.

Our Indianapolis radiologists offer state-of-the-art, minimally invasive, nonsurgical procedures, and have accumulated one of the largest single center practices in the country. Interventional Physicians of Indiana is a leading provider of kyphoplasty and back pain management services and have served Central Indiana since 2003.

Top Back Pain Treatments

 

What is the Treatment for Acute Painful Vertebral Compression?

Kyphoplasty is offered for patients with acute painful compression fractures of the spine. These fractures typically cause severe pain and may lead to the patients being wheelchair bound or bedridden, with severely limited daily activities.

What is Kyphoplasty?
The kyphoplasty procedure is a minimally invasive, non-surgical, outpatient treatment performed through one or two needle holes for each spine fracture. The needles are inserted using the latest in high resolution imaging technology. Balloons are inserted through the needle(s) to re-expand the bone; the resultant cavity is filled with a bone cement to internally cast the broken bone. Kyphoplasty procedures typically result in greater than 90 percent of patients experiencing near-complete or complete pain relief.

What are Epidural Steroid Injections (ESI)? 
A minimally invasive outpatient procedure performed by injecting a mixture of a steroid and long-acting anesthetic into the epidural space (a space containing nerves and nerve roots), using X-ray guidance. ESI are typically performed for central (axial) back or neck pain. Some indications for ESI include back pain from degenerative/bulging/herniated discs, spinal stenosis, and spinal nerve root inflammation (such as shingles).

What is a Selective Nerve Root Block? 
A minimally invasive outpatient procedure is an injection of a small amount of steroid and numbing medication around a very specific nerve root/spinal nerve that exits out of the spinal cord. It uses live X-ray guidance (fluoroscopy) to ensure the medication is delivered to the correct location. The main indication for a SNRB is a patient with peripheral (arm or leg) pain, which is felt to be secondary to compression/inflammation of a specific nerve root(s).

What are Medial Facet or Medial Branch Blocks?
Facet blocks and medial branch blocks are typically ordered for patients who have pain primarily in their back coming from arthritic changes in the facet joints or for mechanical low back pain.

A facet block is an injection of local anesthetic and steroid into a joint in the spine. A medial branch block is similar but the medication is placed outside the joint space near the nerve that supplies the joint called the medial branch (steroid may or may not be used).

A medial branch block interrupts the sensory nerve supply to the involved facet joint through the use of a precise administration of an anesthetic agent and steroid. After a local skin anesthetic is applied, the physician uses fluoroscopy (x-ray) guidance to place a needle along the nerves that supply the inflamed joint.

You may require multiple injections depending upon how many joints are involved.

What are Sacroiliac Joint Injections?

SI joint injections are minimally invasive, outpatient procedures performed by injecting a mixture of a steroid and long-acting anesthetic into the SI joint, using X-ray guidance.

Skiing and Back Pain

 

As heavy snow is covering mountaintops, many of us will be hitting the slopes this season. For some people, however, this much-loved activity can flare up previous and current injuries. Downhill skiing and snowboarding can result in both serious and minor injuries if you are not prepared. Skiers and snowboarders often require specific conditioning and workout routines not only to perform better and prevent fatigue, but also to reduce the risk of injury on the slopes. Strength, flexibility, endurance, and agility drills for skiers and boarders are all essential for recreational and expert skiers. Most skiers return to the slopes after months, if not years, away. While some athletes participate in other sports during the off-season to stay in shape, many are weekend warriors. No matter how experienced a skier you are, you could wind up with minor aches, pains, or even a serious injury if you do not spend some time preparing for this demanding sport.

So here are a few things to be aware of that will help you avoid unnecessary injuries:

  • Exercise: Begin exercising to prep for the skiing season at least 6 weeks before your trip. You will have a lot more fun on the slopes if you are in good shape.
  • Get your heart pumping: Cycling gives an excellent cardiovascular workout and strengthens those important leg muscles.
  • Core work: Remember to work on your stomach and back muscles. Abdominal crunches, plank exercises, and low back extensions will improve your posture and balance when skiing, not to mention support your spine.
  • It’s a balancing act: Balance is an important factor in skiing. Use a wobble board to improve balance and build up ankle muscles. Rocking heel to toe is good for boarders while left to right is best for skiers.
  • Check it out: Most skiers and boarders find turning one way easier than the other. Poor technique might not be the problem here; in fact, muscle and joint alignment could be causing this. Visit us to sort out any spinal joint dysfunction and improve performance.
  • Respect your limits: Ski on slopes that fit your ability level. Do not ski trails that are above your skill level. Trails will be clearly marked to note what level they are appropriate for. On a similar note, stay in control of your skis and focus on the trail you are skiing. Accidents happen more often when you are distracted.

If you have a back problem on the slope, consider taking lessons from a ski instructor who has experience in teaching individuals with back pain.

Unresolved joint and muscle problems are a sure way to increase your risk of injury. Be sure to consult your doctor before the trip so that your trip is free of pain and injury. All it takes is a bit of care, attention, and common sense to avoid traumas. Remember, pain is a warning – do not ignore it.

Interventional Physicians of Indiana is a leading provider of leg, back pain treatments, relief for acute or chronic pain since 2003. Serving the greater Indianapolis, IN area including Carmel, Westfield, Fishers, Noblesville, Geist, Broad Ripple and Castleton.

Back Pain from Sports: Prevention and Treatment

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Back Pain can be classified into two categories: Acute Pain and Chronic pain.

– Acute Pain: Possible causes include a newly broken bone (vertebra) in the spine from injury or osteoporosis, bulging or herniated discs, nerve irritation from arthritis or degenerative conditions, and infection.

– Chronic Pain: Lasting six months or longer, chronic pain may be caused by previous injuries, arthritic or degenerative conditions including bulging discs, spine canal narrowing (spinal stenosis), old fractures, and bone spurs. This pain may occur daily or intermittently and can interfere with activities of daily living.

Whether you are an athlete or a person who exercises regularly, you can be almost certain of one thing regarding back pain: sooner or later, you will have it. Up to 20% of all sports accidents involve an injury to the lower back or neck. But, some back injuries are simply unavoidable. Athletes accept the risk of back injuries when they decide to play a sport or exercise regularly, vigorously and over a long period of time. Back strains, tears in tendons or ligaments are among the most common sports injuries. Sometimes back strains are triggered by seemingly harmless movements, such as bending over to tie a shoe, picking up a child or reaching up to get something out of a cabinet. Structural problems can also cause lower back pain and may accompany strains. A bulging disk (the soft material between vertebrae) may press against a nerve. And the lower back is one of the most frequent areas affected by osteoarthritis.

Most sports injuries result from:
– Doing too much too quickly.
– Overestimating your fitness and ability.
– Lack of preparation/poor technique.
– Pushing your body too hard (overtraining).
– Poor equipment and accidents.

Some of the ways to prevent back injuries are:
– Avoid sitting in one position for long periods of time. Get up and stretch every 20-25 minutes.
– Execute each movement required in your sport gradually increasing the speed of the movement, before returning to normal training and competition.
– Use lower back support to keep the pressure distributed evenly on the muscles of the lower back.
– Include physical activity in your daily routine. Maintaining a healthy weight minimizes stress on your back. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity – and strength training exercises at least twice a week. Combine aerobic exercise, such as swimming or walking, with exercises that strengthen and stretch your back muscles and abdomen..
– Lift properly. When lifting and carrying a heavy object, lift with your knees and tighten your core muscles. Hold the object close to your body. Maintain the natural curve of your back.
– Modify repetitive tasks. Use lifting devices, when available, to help you lift loads. Try to alternate physically demanding tasks with less demanding ones. If you work in front of a computer, make sure that your monitor, keyboard, mouse and chair are positioned properly. If you’re on the phone most of the day, use a headset. Avoid unnecessary bending, twisting and reaching. Limit the time you spend carrying heavy briefcases, purses and bags.

If you are experiencing back pain, it is important to see a doctor and find out exactly what is causing the pain. Once the cause of pain is found, your doctor will recommend a treatment plan that fits your needs, including exercises that will improve your condition.

Interventional Physicians of Indiana is a leading provider of kyphoplasty and back pain management services and has served Central Indiana since 2003. We offer state-of-the-art, minimally invasive, nonsurgical procedures, and have one of the largest single center practices in the country.

Don’t Wait. Use Your Flexible Spending Account For Back Pain Treatment Now.

 

If you have a Health Flexible Spending Account (FSA), this is the perfect time to take care of that back pain procedure you have been putting off. Stop suffering from back pain and schedule your minimally invasive, non-surgical treatments including kyphoplasty, epidural steroid injections (ESIs), selective nerve root block (SNRB), medical brand (facet joint) denervations, or sacroiliac (SI) joint injections.

Your health FSA lets you use pre-tax dollars to pay for eligible health care expenses for you, your spouse, and your eligible dependents. You can then use your pre-tax FSA dollars to pay for eligible healthcare expenses throughout the plan year.

However, you may be at risk of the “use it or lose it” rule. The IRS requires that all money you put into your health FSA during the plan year must be used to reimburse qualified expenses incurred during that year – funds left over at the end of the year are forfeited. The unused portion of your health FSA cannot be paid to you in cash or other benefits.

In some cases, your employer may offer one of two types of extensions. Check your plan documentation for details on the following:
1. Run-out period: a set number of days after the plan year ends and allows you to submit claims incurred during that year.
2. Grace period: a set number of days after the year of the plan ends, that lasts two months and 15 days. During this time, you can use the remaining FSA funds to reimburse eligible expenses incurred during the grace period.

If you have money remaining in your FSA accounts, take action now:

– Make sure everyone in your family schedules appointments and/or procedures with physicians, dentists and optometrists before the end of the year or grace period.

– Schedule that minimally invasive, non-surgical back pain treatment like kyphoplasty, epidural steroid injections (ESIs), selective nerve root block (SNRB), medical brand (facet joint) denervations, or sacroiliac (SI) joint injections.

– Get flu shots and vaccinations. Has everyone in your family had a flu shot and kept up-to-date with other vaccinations?

– Make sure you double-check medical receipts to confirm you didn’t forget to submit any claims for reimbursement, such as out-of-pocket expenses. Submit any outstanding receipts.

– Replenish first-aid supplies and medicines that need refilling.

The take-away? Make the most of your benefits; check your accounts now to avoid losing money that may accidentally remain unused on your account.

Indiana Back Pain Center has been serving Central Indiana and the Indianapolis metro area since 2003. We are in-network with a number of health insurance providers and accept Medicare and Medicaid. You can find a general list of the insurance providers we work with here. (http://www.indianabackpaincenter.com/insurance/)

One More Reason To Take Care Of Your Back Pain Now

 

New Rules For 2014 Medical Expense Tax Deductions

This is the perfect time to take care of that back pain procedure you have been putting off such as kyphoplasty, epidural steroid injections (ESIs), selective nerve root block (SNRB), medical brand (facet joint) denervations or sacroiliac (SI) joint injections. Taking care of any necessary medical procedures before the end of the calendar year can help you maximize your medical tax deductions.

If you plan to claim a deduction for your medical expenses, there are some new rules this year that may affect your tax return. Here are eight things you should know about the medical and dental expense deduction:

AGI threshold increase.

Starting in 2013, the amount of allowable medical expenses you must exceed before you can claim a deduction is 10 percent of your adjusted gross income. The threshold was 7.5 percent of AGI in prior years.

Temporary exception for age 65.

The AGI threshold is still 7.5 percent of your AGI if you or your spouse is age 65 or older. This exception will apply through Dec. 31, 2016.

You must itemize.

You can only claim your medical and dental expenses if you itemize deductions on your federal tax return. You can’t claim these expenses if you take the standard deduction.

Paid in 2013.

You can include only the expenses you paid in 2013. If you paid by check, the day you mailed or delivered the check is usually considered the date of payment.

Costs to include.

You can include most medical or dental costs that you paid for yourself, your spouse and your dependents. Some exceptions and special rules apply. Any costs reimbursed by insurance or other sources don’t qualify for a deduction.

Expenses that qualify.

You can include the costs of diagnosing, treating, easing or preventing disease. The cost of insurance premiums that you pay for policies that cover medical care qualifies, as does the cost of some long-term care insurance. The cost of prescription drugs and insulin also qualify. For more examples of costs you can deduct, see IRS Publication 502, Medical and Dental Expenses.

Travel costs count.

You may be able to claim the cost of travel for medical care. This includes costs such as public transportation, ambulance service, tolls and parking fees. If you use your car, you can deduct either the actual costs or the standard mileage rate for medical travel. The rate is 24 cents per mile for 2013.

No double benefit.

You can’t claim a tax deduction for medical and dental expenses you paid with funds from your Health Savings Accounts or Flexible Spending Arrangements. Amounts paid with funds from those plans are usually tax-free.

Medical facilities typically experience a heavy demand for procedures towards the end of the year as patients try to maximize their benefits, so the sooner you schedule your appointment, the better. Waiting until the last minute could cause you to miss the opportunity to see your doctor before the year ends.

For more information visit: IRS Tax Tip 2014-21, February 26, 2014

Take Care of Your Back Pain: Make the Most of your Annual Medical Insurance Deductible or Flexible Spending Account (FSA)

 

The leaves are turning. There’s a chill in the air. The end of the year is quickly approaching. In all the holiday frenzy make time to take care of yourself. Now is the time to make sure you’re getting the maximum benefit from your health insurance plan.

If you’ve been putting off a procedure – especially if you’ve met your annual deductible or you’re close to it or if you have funds remaining in your Flexible Spending Account – now is the time.

The fact that your procedure may be of little or no cost to you could be just the motivation you need to take care of those nagging aches and pains.

DEDUCTIBLES AND MAXIMUM OUT-OF-POCKET EXPENSES

Most health insurance policies calculate deductibles and maximum out-of-pocket expenses based on a calendar year. All copays, deductibles and out-of-pocket expenses are reset on the first of January. Any medical expenses you acquire during that calendar year will be applied towards your deductible and must be paid out-of-pocket until your deductible is met. At this point, insurance begins to pay for services, which may be covered at 100 percent or may require you to pay coinsurance (a percentage of your claim expense).

If you have already met your annual deductible, this is the perfect time to take care of that back pain procedure you have been putting off such as kyphoplasty, epidural steroid injections (ESIs), selective nerve root block (SNRB), medical brand (facet joint) denervations or sacroiliac (SI) joint injections.

Coverage of procedures will vary by insurance company, but this is still a good time to take action.

FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNTS

Another factor to consider is your flexible-spending account (FSA). These pre-tax contributions can be used to pay for eligible medical expenses, but they expire at the end of your benefit period and must be forfeited.

Taking care of any necessary medical procedures before the end of the calendar year can help you apply your unused FSA funds before they expire. Medical facilities typically experience a heavy demand for procedures towards the end of the year as patients try to maximize their benefits, so the sooner you schedule your appointment, the better. Waiting until the last minute could cause you to miss the opportunity to see your doctor before the year ends.

Schedule your appointment today, and let your insurance policy work for you.

Back Pain And Sports: Active Treatment

 

The back is a complicated system of bones and muscles. Each piece plays a vital role in your ability to move. Inactivity leads to atrophy of those intricate components. Overexertion can result in muscle and joint pain, or sore bones. Back pain can also be caused by poor posture, being overweight, ill-advised or awkward lifting, or from an accident. Or you may simply be getting older. By some estimates, more than 80 percent of all people will suffer from back pain.

One of the easiest ways to stave off back pain and discomfort is to remain active in sports. Here are five popular suggestions:

Swimming – Laps in a pool may not seem that exciting, but a good swim requires you to use nearly all of your muscles. Your back muscles, in particular, will get a full workout and your spine will naturally correct.
Running – Nothing gets your heart racing quite like running. You’ll build up stamina while working most of the muscles in your lower body. Running also forces you to fix your posture – you can’t run well if you’re huddled over or pitched to the side. Running can cause you to experience some lower back pain, so it’s crucial you stretch before taking off. If your leg muscles are tight, you’ll try to overcompensate with other muscles, which can lead to awkward running positions and unnecessary stress on your pelvis.
Yoga – Several studies have been completed on the long-term benefits of yoga for those dealing with back ailments. One 60 to 90 minute session a week can improve your back health considerably.
Biking – For those suffering predominantly from lower back pain, biking is a recommended exercise. Biking doesn’t jar the spine the ways other forms of exercise do. Stationary bicycling – not dealing with the variables of natural terrain – is especially gentle on the spine. Leaning forward on a bike alleviates some of the pain. You can also opt for a recumbent bike if traditional bikes are too uncomfortable. Some bike lovers have opted for spinning classes, which are also less stressful on the back.
Golf – Among all sports, golf is one of the most low-impact. Although the frequent twisting of the back to swing can lead to issues, a big advantage is the amount of walking you have to do to play a course. Like running, it gets the blood flowing throughout your body.

Before any active sport, go through a warm-up routine. Doing so prepares your muscles and helps your back get ready for the stress about to begin. Here are some basic warm-up rules:

Stretch – You need to loosen the muscles you’ll be exercising. Stretch common muscles like your hamstrings, triceps, and calf muscles and also twist and rotate the muscles along your back and waist to increase range of motion.
Gradual Improvements – Gradually stretch with simple movements to increase blood flow. Subtly increasing the intensity will help loosen your back muscles.
Practice – Phantom swim before you hit the water. Do a few practice golf swings before you tee up. You want to give your muscles an idea of what’s to come.